RISK TRAJECTORY

How Richard Branson made his first million. The concept to me is rather simple to me, wherever you start or whatever you do use it as a springboard to other things. Risk should be a personal habit and a consistent career trajectory rather than an occasional or one time occurrence.

 

How I Made My First Million: Richard Branson

The tycoon’s journey to a million started from an unlikely source: The Exorcist

British business tycoon Richard Branson is living proof that with enough money, the sky’s the limit. And sometimes not even the sky: his Virgin Group launched a business called Virgin Galactic, which plans to carry wealthy “space tourists” all the way into orbit.

Worth an estimated $5 billion, Branson has used his fortune not just to indulge in expensive hobbies but also to fund a host of humanitarian initiatives.

So how did he make his first million way back when? Believe it or not, there’s a connection to the 1973 horror film The Exorcist.

4 STEP PROBLEM SOLVING

I often use techniques like this in developing my 8 to 12 Point Plans. Because before you can make a Good Plan you must first know what constitutes a Good Plan.

 

Learn to Plan and Problem Solve, and practice both often. You won’t regret the habit.

 

4 steps to becoming a great problem solver

 

COMMENTARY If you’ve ever heard the expression, “That’s why you make the big bucks,” then you were probably on the hook to solve a tough problem. Indeed, the ability to troubleshoot complex issues, fix troubled organizations, beat bigger competitors or successfully manage crises, is highly valued in the corporate world.

Just ask Thomas Horton, the American Airlines executive who was named chairman and CEO of parent company AMR on Tuesday, the day it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. Horton got the job because of his track record dealing with thorny union and regulatory issues. And now AMR’s restructuring, how well it’s positioned when it emerges from bankruptcy and the future of the iconic airline is entirely in his hands…

THE SCIENCE, AND THE ART, OF TECHNOLOGICAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

A friend posted this article earlier today on his Facebook page and I have enough personal interest in the subject and the idea occurs often enough in my own inventions, business projects, and writings that I thought I would comment here on the Launch Port.

The iron could have been inserted later, but my general supposition is that Iron, and possibly even Steel development occurred long before what is historically accounted, in certain isolated areas or as a result of individual experiments by certain particularly gifted smiths.

The “Ages” we attribute to history are really just generalizations on wide-spread (what we would call today industrial and/or historical) development. History implies within the very term that there must be an historical record of a thing, and that this record must be available for recognition and study. Without an historical record of some kind there is no history, but whether any particular thing actually exited or not sans an historical record, that is an entirely separate matter.

But smithing used to be art as much as science and some genius (or geniuses) at any particular period of history (or prehistory or non-history) could have easily leapt well ahead of his contemporaries and either the local ruler(s) suppressed wide-spread dissemination of such techniques or the smith himself (for personal and economic reasons) simply kept the secrets to himself and only manufactured small numbers of such artefacts or weapons. Then again local logistical matters and proper supplying may have prevented iron making en masse (as happened with the Hittites and Egyptians), or it could have been a one-off experiment or even an accident that smith was never able to properly reproduce. My father used to be a tool and dye maker and I saw him conduct any number of one-off experiments which he did not properly document or detail and then he later had trouble reproducing.

We moderns, because of our peculiar “industrial techniques” (that is we concentrate as much upon reproducible manufacturing techniques as we do experimental manufacturing methods) think of manufacturing as purely a science, but I suspect most of our ancestors tended to look upon smithing as primarily an art or at the very least an individualized enterprise of high personal skill and craft. We are scientists who like to mimic art in our productions, they were likely artists who were also proto-scientists, but only proto-scientists. Strict record keeping and precise reproduction was probably not a big concern in their worldview. Actually individualization was probably a far bigger concern for them and for their rulers.

Then again you have those recent historical cases of things like the +Ulfberh+t swords where long materiel trade lines combined with unique individualized skill and craft operations to produce weapons and artefacts well ahead of the rest of the world. That is to say there was some localized sub-masse production but for logistical, military, and economic reasons not mass production.

(After all someone has to be the best in the world – just look at US weapon systems compared to most of the rest of the world. Some archaeologist in the far-future, if records are lost or compromised, might assume that there was no US Superpower Age until much later than actually really occurred because the rest of the world is decades if not centuries behind us. The Truth is that is some respects we’re just decades or centuries ahead of everyone else in our weapon systems development, they are not necessarily decades or centuries behind us.)

I suspect the real Truth is that it is a normal thing throughout history and pre-history for some geniuses or particularly cunning individuals to leap well ahead of the curve where the rest of the world is concerned, and when you have ages or eons where it is uncommon to keep records or to store such records properly or even near the artefacts these geniuses create then it is easy to assume that nothing occurs until it becomes obviously apparent to everyone via mass production, or through common usage. But small scale or individualized examples of the thing might have very well existed centuries before such things become common. And because of their small number of productions it is easy to see such examples misplaced, looted, or destroyed and therefore not available for historical discovery or examination.

Truth is someone right now is creating something decades if not centuries ahead of everyone else but it won’t become recognized and it won’t be the “Age of X…” until that thing is widely recognized or able to be mass produced for whatever reasons or reasons.

http://www.humanistictexts.org/sumer.htm#4%20Praise%20of%20Urukagina

 

Introduction

Our oldest written records come from the civilization of Sumer, which arose in around the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in what is now southern Iraq. The chief cities such as Uruk, Nippur, Ur, and Lagash play a prominent role in the history of the region, being built and destroyed many times over as wars developed between the city states and between them and the surrounding tribes. The Uruk period, 3,750-3150 BCE, saw the emergence of warrior kings, magnificent temples, intensive agriculture by means of irrigation, and the first pictographic writing in 3300 BCE. The early kings gained mythical status,  most notably in the case of Lugualbanda and Gilgamesh, whose myths have survived

Pictographic writing evolved into the cueiform script, made with a reed pressed into soft clay. As clay lasts far longer than vegetable materials, Sumerian cuneiform documents dating as far back as 3100 BCE have been found. A flourishing cuneiform literature in the Sumerian language developed, reaching its peak in the centuries around 2000 BCE. The Sumerian language is not part of the Indo-European group and was replaced in the second millenium by Semitic languages as tribes from the Western deserts and elsewhere moved into the fertile crescent and conquered the area, giving rise to the civilizations of Babylon and Assyria. 

Some insight into Sumerian values can be gained from praise poems written for kings. While the kings may not always live up to this praise they show the type of achievments that they wished to be remembered by. The ones used here to provide characteristic extracts praise Urukagina (Uruinimagina, c 2350) and Gudea (2141-2122), who ruled from Lagash, and Ur-Nammu (2112-2095) and Shulgi (Culgi, 2094-2047), who ruled from Ur. Urukagina appears as a social reformer, getting rid of gross abuses of power that had taken hold in Lagash. He ruled for only eight years, after which the abuses must have returned, because Gudea, a few centuries later, instituted similar reforms. Gudea was also an energetic builder of temples, the most elaborate being at Girsu. The surviving text describing its construction provides insight into the richness of his city state and the dispersed regions from which Sumer acquired resources. As he is not recorded as a constant warrior, many of these materials were probably acquired in trading…

 

PROTECTING WHAT IS YOURS

Since almost all work nowadays is written (in some form) or at the very least documented in writing, this is some very good advice about protecting your intellectual property rights and your work.

What Creative People Need To Do To Protect Their Work

Careful where you sign–before you write off your rights to hard work.

With so many ways to share and publish online, it may seem virtually impossible to protect your work from being exploited.

But according to Robert C. Cumbow, an attorney for the Seattle-based law firm, Graham & Dunn PC, who works closely with creative professionals, there are a few simple measures you can take and details you should know to make sure you’re not being exploited…

 

http://www.fastcompany.com/3033114/hit-the-ground-running/what-every-creative-person-needs-to-do-to-protect-their-work?partner=rss

 

THE ONLY KIND from THE BUSINESS, CAREER, AND WORK OF MAN

The only kind of talk that ever matters is that talk which leads to an actionable, successful, and workable Plan.

Everything else is just talk.

VISA CHECKS OUT

SAN FRANCISCO – Visa Inc. has launched its answer to online shopping woes for consumers and merchants alike – Visa Checkout, a new product that’s geared towards making e-commerce and mobile payments quicker and simpler.

On Tuesday, the payments processor and financial services giant announced Visa Checkout’s debut in the U.S. Right now, the biggest pain point for retailers is when consumers put items in their shopping cart but then abandon them, often because it’s tedious to enter their billing and shipping information. Visa Checkout is meant to tackle that problem, said Sam Shrauger, Visa’s senior vice president of digital solutions.

He demonstrated how consumers can quickly set up a username and password and instantly add Visa credit and debit cards to their accounts. When they go to pay for an item at an online store, they simply pick their card or use a default one, without being redirected away from the page they’re visiting…

http://www.itbusiness.ca/news/visa-checkout-to-simplify-e-commerce-and-mobile-payments/49999

THE REAL PROBLEM from THE BUSINESS, CAREER AND WORK OF MAN

The first step in successfully solving any problem is to be brutally honest about the true cause and nature of the problem. For if you are brutally honest about both the true cause and nature of the problem then it is entirely possible to be brutally honest about what will actually be required to obtain a real solution. But without such brutal and realistic honesty it will never be possible to obtain a real solution or to reach a true conclusion to the problem. Without honesty, painful and accurate honesty, the problem will continue to plague you in one form or another indefinitely, and no lesser or less honest efforts will ever successfully resolve it.

THE BUSINESS OF CREATIVITY

My personal opinion is that not only should we seek out Creativity, but we should also seek ways to become more Creative, and ways to creatively bring Creativity under our own conscious control. That is true in art, literature, invention, science, business, finance, and even religion.

“Creativity does not rest on eureka moments — it is a process, designed to consistently bring abstract ideas into the tangible world.

For creatives, this emphasizes the importance of routines.

Random bits of profound inspiration are few and fleeting; consistent work in your craft requires a sustainable way to develop good ideas into great ones.

Recall the wise words from Chuck Close: “Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just show up and go to work.”

Perhaps one of the best ways to improve your own processes is to study the masters. Thanks to books like “Daily Rituals,” our desire to see what “go to work” means — by getting a peek into regular routines — has been thoroughly satiated.”

 

Full Article here: http://www.businessinsider.com/beethovens-creative-strategy-2014-7

Read more: http://www.sparringmind.com/creative-ideas/#ixzz37OFRx9DK

UNDERWAY

My three new blogs are now fully up and running:

 

WYRDWEND – My Literary, Art, and Writing blog, covering my fiction and non-fiction writings, my poetry, my songwriting, and my art: http://wyrdwend.wordpress.com/

 

LAUNCH PORT – My Business, Capital, and Invention blog and the blog of OPEN DOOR COMMUNICATIONS: https://launchport.wordpress.com/

 

and,

 

TOME AND TOMB – My Gaming and Game Design blog: http://tomeandtomb.wordpress.com/

 

You are most welcome to visit all three. They will also soon all be cross-linked. I hope you enjoy the content and there is much more to come. This is just the beginning.

 

Thanks,

 

Jack.

THE 8 TO 12 POINT PLAN

I know I’ve discussed this subject before, and will discuss it again, but I’m a big believer in forward planning and in being thoroughly prepared. Good plans and being well prepared have brought me a number of successes, have often averted or mitigated unforeseen disasters I and my family (might) have suffered, have allowed me to save other people’s lives on a few occasions, and have saved my own life on numerous occasions.

As for your business and career, well, it goes without saying, “good planning and proper preparation is at all times essential to both productivity and prosperity.” I can say a great deal about planning, very little of it bad.

One personal weakness I have always suffered from in this regard, however, is over-planning. It took me years to come to really understand that with most things, a simple, streamlined, focused, uncomplicated plan of action is vastly superior to an exhausting, unwieldy, inflexible, overly complex plan trying to cover all contingencies. By all means plan for all reasonably foreseeable contingencies, but do not become paralyzed or enveloped by them.

Once I realized that, somewhere in my thirties, I began to change my Planning Habits. Efficiency and productivity became my Planning Watchwords. Slowly those better planning habits became ingrained in my mind and soul.

So in the past few years I’ve developed The 8 to 12 Point Plan.

Since that time almost every Plan I’ve developed has been in the 8 to 12 point format. I’ve even taken all of my older plans and revised them; whittling away the unnecessary or cumbersome steps and reducing almost all of them down to the 8 to 12 point format.

What exactly is an 8 to 12 Point Plan? Well, simply stated it is devising or reducing all of your plans down to a very basic formulation of 8 to 12 simple and easily executed steps.
I have found by experimentation that if most plans contain less than 8 steps then you are likely to leave out important information or necessary steps to fully achieve your objective. More than 12 primary steps and the plan is probably going to be so complicated and unwieldy that it will hamper success, rather than assure it.

Of course, there are exceptions. Really big projects may well require more than 12 steps; really small ones may require no more than 3 or 4 Essential Action Points. But overall, and generally speaking, the average project, objective, or serious enterprise usually requires 8 to 12 Solid Steps or Action Points to achieve rapid and successful completion.

In the near future, as part of my current Summer Offensive, I plan to write an eBook On Successful Planning which will precisely detail how to create and develop an effective and efficient Eight to Twelve Point Plan.

Until then I’ll simply say this, I highly recommend the strategy. Most problems in life are easy prey for an effective and efficient 8 to 12 Point Plan.

THE SILK ROAD TO ELSEWHERE

Where is this going?
Offshore apparently…

bitcoins-660x439

“The nearly 30,000 bitcoins auctioned off by the U.S. Marshals Service last week will be put to use building digital currency businesses outside of the United States.

The bitcoins are part of a massive cache of digital currency seized by the feds in connection with last year’s bust of the Silk Road online drug marketplace. In a first, they were auctioned by the Marshals Service last Friday, but until today, nobody knew who’d purchased them. It turns out that the auction’s winner was venture capitalist Tim Draper, and he’s going to store them with a company he has invested in called Vaurum. The startup sells software and services to international companies that want to set up their own bitcoin exchanges…”

article continued

HUMAN HABIT

THE TEN HABITS

Many people do not understand the relationship between their habits and their character, or between their outlook and their Nature. Yet it is evidently and obviously there in all we do. The great thing is all parts of our selves are under our own control. If we wish them to be.

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“1. They see challenges as opportunities

Most people interpret fears as obstacles and tend to run away from them. People who live their purpose successfully have developed the capacity to see fear as a sign of what they really need to go for and put all their courage and energy into it.

2. They see life as a game.

Having this vision of life opens up space for playfulness and creativity instead of limitation. This also cultivates qualities of resilience, problem solving and confidence that helps them take risks to get to the next big place.

 

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3. Living the life they want is the only option.

They’re so committed to making their dreams a reality that they banish any possibility of a backup plan whatsoever from their mind. They don’t think things like, “If it doesn’t work, I’ll just go get a job.”

4. They always speak their truth.

They’re able to speak it because they make a conscious effort to connect to their truest desires, their inner voice, and their spirituality without fear of judgment. This connection is typically fostered through meditation, journaling, being mentored and being surrounded by like minded-people…”

continued in original article.

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