REFERENTIAL TREATMENT

Wise advice when referring to such enterprises.

In my opinion references are not only a two way street, they are a multi-lane overpass leading in so many possible directions that you never know where the road might eventually end. If it does end.

References should be looked upon the same way you look upon clients and employees, as Human Capital.

 

5 Things Super-Smart People Do to Prepare Their References

Great references can help you clinch a job offer or new client. So why not help them help you?
IMAGE: Getty Images

You’ve applied for a job or pitched a new customer. Interest seemed high, and you’ve provided a list of references in hopes of closing the deal. But do you know exactly what those references will say, and whether–even inadvertently–they’re failing to make you seem like a top contender?

Before you give a reference, your best strategy is to know exactly what that reference will say. And while it can seem awkward to prepare a reference for questions he or she may receive, that’s exactly what you should do. That advice comes from career counselor Peter K. Studner, author of the book and website Super Job Search IV. Here’s the approach he recommends:

1. Choose your references carefully.

You want your reference to not only sing your praises, but also support any claims you’ve made about your skills, or the qualities of your product and service. So try to choose people who’ve had specific experiences that will show you and your work in the best light. If you’re referring customers, look for those who can tell a good story about how your product or service solved a problem in exactly the way you want to promote. If you’re applying for a job, consider former managers–but also people you’ve managed and helped to mentor, particularly if you’re looking for a managerial position.

“In addition, put some thought into how your references might present you to potential employers,” Studner advises. “Effective references are good communicators who can discuss you and your work in an objective manner without exaggerating.” A reference who’s bad at communication, impossible to reach, or will offer an unnecessarily long-winded tribute might do you more harm than good.

2. Figure out how each reference can best help you.

An innocent comment about your personality or approach can easily raise a red flag with a hiring manager or cautious customer, so try to have as good an idea as you can of what your reference might say. If you can, set the stage by letting each reference know the specific skills or benefits of your product you would like them to mention. This might be different from reference to reference, and depending on the customer or job you’re seeking.

3. Meet with your references.

Ideally, Studner says, this should be an in-person meeting, but you can also talk by phone or video chat if that’s impractical. Keep in mind that, both for the meeting and for the reference itself, you’re asking someone to sacrifice their time–the most precious commodity any professional has these days. So use that time wisely, and express your appreciation.

4. Ask the tough questions.

That is, the same tough questions that a prospective customer or employer is likely to ask. An employer might ask why you left the company, what your greatest areas for improvement were, and whether they would hire you again. If you’re applying for a managerial position, they will ask about your leadership skills. They are also likely to ask who else in the company managed you–and then also contact these others and ask for their thoughts as well, even if you did not list them as a reference. Both you and your reference should be prepared for this question.

A prospective customer may ask about anything that went wrong with your product or service, whether they would purchase it again, and may also ask if your reference can refer them to any other of your current or past customers. They may also ask about any price concessions you made. Your reference should be prepared to answer all of these.

5. Keep in touch.

Don’t think of your references as a one-time need. They’re an asset to your career just like your resume or branding materials. So keep them in the loop about jobs you’ve applied for or customers you’ve pitched so they’re not caught by surprise when these companies get in touch. If appropriate, ask the reference to let you know if they’ve been contacted and how the conversation went.

Going forward, nurture the relationship. Look for opportunities to send your reference useful articles or make introductions that might benefit him or her. Remember that references can make or break your career. “Don’t treat references as an afterthought,” Studner says.

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SCOUTING THE BRAVE

He’s absolutely right. Too many Chiefs, not enough Braves. But you can’t win a war with only the Chiefs fighting, too few of them to matter, and most aren’t good fighters anyway… the Braves win the war. Or not.

How To Hire When Everyone Wants To Found Their Own Startup

Back before founding a company was cool, it was a lot easier to get a lot of smart people in a room. Rock stars were hireable because they weren’t forging their own paths. That led to powerhouse teams like the “PayPal Mafia” seen below.

Alongside the future founders of LinkedIn, YouTube and Yelp at PayPal was Keith Rabois, now of Khosla Ventures. Today at the Postseed Conference in SF, Rabois explained how PayPal was lucky to start at the right stage of the talent dilution cycle.

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According to Rabois, during down times when there’s not a lot of funding or fever to start companies, it’s easy to hire great talent. With enough intelligence centralized on a few startups, they grow. With time and success, hype builds around the idea of entrepreneurship and being a founder becomes a full-blown fetish.

Eager to coin on the success of the ecosystem, funding becomes plentiful and smart people found their own companies rather than join others. It becomes tougher to get a critical mass of talent on the same team. These companies raise money but don’t have the skills to win big and deliver returns. The bubble deflates, hype around startups cools off, and it becomes easier to hire strong people again.

Keith Rabois

 

But what should startups do if they’re unlucky enough to be getting off the ground when there’s a ton of recruiting competition and everyone wants to start their own company? You know, like now?

Rabois laid out four strategies for founders facing a tough hiring climate:

  • Sell The Mission – Founders must learn to convince potential recruits that their company will do good for the world, not just make a lot of money. Sure, they could go start their own company and potentially get rich, but joining this one will let them have a real impact. Founders have to sell both this macro mission, but also the micro mission of why the recruit’s contribution will be critical to making people’s lives better
  • Recruit Outside Of Central Casting – Rather than just trying to hire seasoned technologists or entrepreneurs, Rabois suggests sidestepping that scene and looking for people beyond the startup sphere. That could include prodigy college kids or geniuses from other industries, who haven’t seduced themselves into founding a company.
  • Create A Founder Culture – People often become founders because they can’t or think they can’t submit to being managed by someone else. To hire these types, companies have to build a culture where free-thinking self-starters can flourish. Rather than process-driven bureaucracy and hierarchy, founders must empower employees to make and execute decisions so they feel self-actualized while still having a boss.
  • Mentorship – Create a culture of learning, not just doing. When founder types know they can get an education that could help them start a company later, they’ll be more willing to join one now. If they only stay two years before fleeing, that’s still two years of valuable talent, and it’s on the founders to make the company interesting enough that employees want to stick around.

The tactics might seem time-consuming, but early hires set the tone for the company, and mediocre recruits can be toxic. It’s worth the effort for founders to enlist lieutenants they can trust to inspire the rest of the troops.

BUILDING YOUR BRAND

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/fgdi45ehikj/5-must-read-tips-for-building-a-brand-3/

EXCELLENT BUSINESS CARD EXAMPLES

Business Card Examples

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Become a Branding Expert—OnDemand Design Webcast CollectioA couple of weeks ago, we brought you 14 of the best business cards in the biz, knowing we had only to reach out to designers and firms at the top of their game to get our hands on their business cards. Then we found 12 more of the best business cards created for clients.

Now, now we’re bringing you even more business card examples. This time, many readers sent in their cards and clients’ cards, and we threw those into the mix.

What do you think of these business card designs? Which would you call a great business card?


 

business card examples; Rule29

Designer: Justin Ahrens
Material/Production: Neenah Classic crest Solar White #100 cover; 3/3 with registered emboss and custom PMS
Printer: O’Neil Printing
Client: Rule29

 

business card examples; Nice Branding Agency

Designer/Client: Nice Branding Agency
Material: Silk cards with gold foil accents

 

3b

Designer/Client: Kevin Greene

 

4

Designer: Jocelyne Saulnier
Material: 16pt silk matte laminate, with a luggage tag die line
Printer: Jukeboxprint
Client: Front Porch Mercantile

 

5

Designer/Client: Jay Smith, Juicebox Designs

 

6 6b

Designer/Client: Chomp

 

7

Designer/Client: Antony Wilcock 
Material/Production: Duplexed Colorplan citrine and grey card—total weight 540 gsm, gloss foil one side and matt grey foil on reverse.
Printer: IST Printing Services

8


Designer/Client:
 Chad Michael
Printer: Studio On Fire
Photo by: Hannah Heinrich

 

9a 9b

Designer: Tom Davy, Ten2Two
Client: Bodymasters Gym and Nutrition

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10

– See more at: http://www.howdesign.com/design-business/design-news/business-card-examples/#sthash.NbdJ2Ntp.dpuf

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