QUANTUM RECHARGING AND SPIN ALIGNMENT

I was charging my cell phone just now when I was struck with a great idea regarding the eventual miniaturization of things like quantum computing.

A charger and switch filter which doesn’t just charge your phone but does things likes control the flow of electrons so tightly that you can even arrange how the spins align on the battery or circuits to achieve things like spintronically aligned quantum computing and the room temperature mimicry of superconductivity.

Functions might be practically unlimited based on exactly how we could devise and design the actual control elements.

THE ADVENTURES OF END-OVER: THE BUTT-NAKED BUSINESSMAN

I thought about posting this to my literary blog, but… then I thought to myself, no, this story contains so many of the lessons I’ve learned in business and regarding corporate espionage that I’ll put it here, on Launch Port.

I’ll continue writing the story in sections and then serialize it here on Launch Port. Enjoy.

 

THE BUTT-NAKED BUSINESSMAN


Chapter One: The Breeched Bureau

(First Draft)

End-Over placed his luggage at the foot of the bureau. The important thing about a bureau in his mind, if you were going to have one at all, was that it be tightly arranged and well ordered. Most people didn’t understand this, even those who made much use of bureaus. Then again, most people started at the over, and not at the end. He had been born breeched. The end as the logical starting place was natural to him.

It also struck many people as either odd, or humorous, or both, that he would bring so much luggage to a Nudist Camp. But to him, if you were going to camp, the important thing was to always be prepared. Being naked in the face of being nude was to him a very different thing than being both naked and nude. The nude part he had worked himself up to without much trouble. Truth was he had always preferred being nude. The being naked though, that was another matter. They didn’t mesh well in his mind with the other parts of himself. Nude was just another form of camouflage, and another form of gregarious sociability. Naked was, well, it was being naked. You either got that, or you didn’t. End-Over got it, and because of that, he avoided naked.

Everyone at the colony, for he preferred to call it a Colony rather than a Camp, called him John. Or Tule. Because he told everyone his real name was John Tuli. It wasn’t of course, and it wasn’t the only alias he employed. After all real names left one naked, and considering that he was a businessman and considering his business, he was satisfied to let everyone else see him nude rather than naked. His name didn’t interfere with his time at the Colony, it didn’t interfere with his fun, it didn’t make him any less likely to be what he was or to do what he’d do, it was just a name. A corporate structure. He wasn’t attached to it. He wasn’t even attached to his real name. It implied certain things about him, helped clarified aspects of his past. Like all names though it was self-limiting, wasn’t really descriptive at all, other than the meaning others attached to it. Public names, real, or imagined, or created, were like terms to him. Something you could hang an idea on, not something you could develop a solid, working description from. He had a secret name for himself, something no-one else knew. Well, no-one else except maybe God. But it wasn’t a naked name, and it wasn’t a nude name, and it wasn’t a public name, and it wasn’t even a private name. It was a name he used when he talked to himself. Which was often enough that he was respectful of it. So he never used it otherwise, and never spoke it in vain.

He turned from the bureau and examined the room he stood in. It was part of the same cabin he always stayed at when he visited the colony. The floors were stained hardwood, dusty and warm, it seemed to him, no matter what time of year he visited. The furniture was typically resort issue. Standing floor lamps, warm yellow bulbs that shed very little light. That was perfectly fine by him.

The bed was low slung, with no headboard. The mattress was new, and the sheets clean and well tended. On his pillow lay a single wrapped chocolate and with a white rose topping a crisp, bright, white envelop with gold, calligraphic insignia cut to conceal a card rather than a letter. The card was no doubt the typical greeting he always received whenever he visited.

The small kitchen would be clean, swept, dry, and sterile. The floor tiles black and white, the polished faux granite counters would gleam dully. The sinks would shine, the faucets would be scrubbed. Dishes would be neatly stacked and put away in their proper places. The silverware would look as if just purchased. The white-frosted, spherical, enclosed light fixtures would hang halfway between the roof and the floor of the vaulted kitchen ceiling. The refrigerator and freezer would be completely empty of anything but ice, which would be plentiful, and the cabinets would be entirely bare. This didn’t matter to him though; he would stock his own larder. He preferred it that way.

The single bathroom of his cabin would be spotless, the toilet almost pristine, a large shaving mirror would hang above a sink free of all traces it had ever been previously used, and a full length door mirror would decorate the inside door of the bathroom. The bath would be part programmable Jacuzzi, part rounded tub, and would conceal a detachable, multi-pulse showerhead. He liked the set up and looked forward to a few long, relaxing soaks at night while he listened to opera and dozed in the warm water. Which he would salt and pour white wine in for the smell, and because it would relax him all the more…

 

GOING ALL THE WAY

Reasons to Land on a Comet: What the Rosetta Mission Can Learn

November 12, 2014

The Agilkia landing site is seen on this image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken with Rosetta’s navigation camera, just days before its lander, Philae, makes its historic descent to the surface

Courtesy European Space Agency

The Agilkia landing site is seen on this image of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken with Rosetta’s navigation camera, just days before its lander, Philae, makes its historic descent to the surface

After a journey that took more than a decade, the world is scheduled to witness a first when the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission attempts to land a small spacecraft on the surface of a comet. The attempt will take place on Wednesday, at speeds of about 34,000 miles per hour.

The mission is a potential breakthrough in the study of comets. These chunks of ice and dust are leftovers from the formation of planets, often considered space “icebergs” given their age and distance from the sun. The water that resides in comets is likely the key to sustaining future deep-space missions—a celestial gasoline station, in a sense. Beyond water, comets such as the now-famous 67P are thought to harbor complex organic molecules, some of the ingredients needed for the formation of intelligent life.

“I think that humans have to go into space more and take ownership of the solar system,” says Denton Ebel, chairman of the division of physical sciences at the American Museum of Natural History, calling efforts such as Rosetta “the logical next step” of human space exploration.

There is yet another reason underlying the space agency’s financial and engineering feat: to prove it’s possible. Before attempting to land on the comet, the spacecraft will have whipped around the earth three times, followed by Mars, to obtain the necessary gravitational acceleration to rendezvous with a comet. The Rosetta craft will discharge a 220-pound landing probe, called Philae, to settle in a relatively clear spot only about 1/3-mile square.

“It’s technically one of the most difficult missions ever,” Ebel says. “This mission is amazingly ambitious.”

Other reasons to visit a comet include getting a better understanding of how massive space rocks are constructed, which could prove crucial if future earthlings ever need to intercept and prevent a doomsday scenario. There is also the issue of manned deep-space exploration and using the abundant resources found in comets and asteroids, mainly water and noxious gases but also precious metals. “How is the water locked up in a comet? We don’t really understand that at all,” Ebel says.

Future space explorers will almost certainly need to stop for water en route. Bring water from earth into space costs about $23,000 per pound, according to Planetary Resources, which plans to mine asteroids. The hydrogen and oxygen in water is also the basis for rocket fuel that will be produced in space.

The Rosetta mission was launched in March 2004 and reached Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Aug. 6, where it has been orbiting about 14 miles from the surface. The comet is about 2.5 miles across at its widest point.

Confirmation of the Philae lander’s fate is expected to arrive at about 10:36 a.m. EST at the mission control in Darmstadt, Germany, following a seven-hour descent to the comet. The agency has deployed a full array of social media to chronicle the landing, including collaborating with a futuristic film dramatization starring Game of Thrones actor Aidan Gillan and a soundtrack of the sub-audible magnetic emissions from the comet, sped up so they can be heard. Come Wednesday, there will be tweets.

THE NEW START UP CLUB

  The $5 Billion Startup Club: The 9 Highest Valued Startups That You Should Definitely Keep An Eye On

dollar billsMark Wilson/Getty ImagesBillions of dollars are flowing into these startups.

There used to be a time when a $1 billion valuation was considered a massive success for tech startups.

But in recent years, there’s been so many of them that billion-dollar valuations are almost starting to feel routine in tech.

So we’ve raised the bar and narrowed down WSJ’s “The Billion-Dollar Startup Club” list to companies that are valued at more than $5 billion.

These startups are transforming our lives and they’re definitely worth keeping an eye on moving forward.

A THING UNQUESTIONED from THE BUSINESS, CAREER, AND WORK OF MAN

A thing unquestioned and untested is unproven and unimprovable.

S’PLANATION

The Tech That Drives The New Tesla Model S, Explained

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The Tech That Drives The New Tesla Model S, ExplainedExpand

Last night, Elon Musk took the wraps off the new Tesla Model S. Dual motors and all-wheel drive don’t just make it faster, a new sensor array will make it safer too. Let’s break out each innovation, figure out what it is and how it works.

THE SLIP SUIT

This morning while walking in the woods with Sam I was watching a leaf fall, saw it hit a spider’s web (a big one) then turn in a certain way, slip the web, and continue on to the ground.

Suddenly I was hit by a superb idea for a new type of ballistic armor I’m going to call the Slip-Suit. The basic idea will not be to absorb impact from projectiles, but to “slip impact.”

The way I have the Slip-Suit envisioned it should easily be able to be created using current technologies and current materials, though some materials may have to be reconstructed or realigned din design of the suit to function properly.

Also the idea is so close in basic concept to some of the functions of my Aisthpleis Suit that I am seriously considering seeing if they can be integrated in some way. But both suits are so radical in function that their separate technologies may not be integrate-able. It may be possible to put a Slip-Suit beneath the Aisthpleis, but because the Aisthpleis relies so heavily on direct contact with the human body that may not be possible. It may be possible to coat certain areas of the outer surface of the Aisthpleis with parts of the Slip-Suit material (The Slippage) but I’ll just have to see.

This will be a fairly high-tech development so I’ll need the Museus to eventually help me build and capitalize it.

I have classified it – (HT) 1f,g,h:4c:5:7:8

 

The whole incident also gave me an idea for a much more advanced type of personal suit I’ll call the Explacesure Suit. But this idea is really along the liens more of a science fiction development, than a Real World Invention. The technologies involved and the energy consumption rates that would be required would be enormous and well beyond current technological limits.

As a matter of fact Explacesure is really base upon a defensive combat system I designed for human spacecraft back when I was a kid.

So Explacement will probably have to remain more just a speculative concept and an idea I use in my fiction writings, rather than a viable product invention.

OPEN IN YOUR HAND

The trouble with technology is not just what it does
But what it doesn’t for us all when we forget what was
When it makes us more of us it does its function well
When it lessens (lessons) what we are it is a kind of hell

The greatness of the things we do when robots do them not
Is greater than all other things machines cannot allot
However if our sole (soul) device does make ourselves much more
What’s the harm in all of that, that’s nothing to abhor

Plant your skills and grow them tall so that they flourish high
If by doing it yourself then raise them to the sky
If by invention, will, or craft you use an artefact
Then employ it to improve yourself, not in the cold abstract

The trouble with technology is not the way it is
But in the things we make of it when little we intend
A tool’s a tool, a thing a thing, it never is the man
How we use it, or we don’t, lies open in your hand…

THE GOOD MACHINE AND THE BAD MACHINE from THE BUSINESS, CAREER, AND WORK OF MAN

There is the good machine and the bad machine. The good machine emulates the way God works, the bad machine emulates the way hell works.

ESSENTIAL BRANSON

Indeed.

Branson recounts excellent advice and experience on adventure, leadership, risk, and entrepreneurship…

 

Richard Branson’s Tech Essentials

The founder of the Virgin Group and author of the new book “The Virgin Way: Everything I Know About Leadership,” on his training regimen for space travel and the enduring appeal of the BlackBerry Curve

Sept. 19, 2014 3:52 p.m. ET

SKY HIGH | Richard Branson on the 103rd floor of the Empire State Building Juliana Sohn for The Wall Street Journal

I’m still clinging to my trusty BlackBerry Curve, because of the keyboard. There aren’t many of us left. I use it for sending emails but also have an iPhone for posting Instagram pictures and browsing Twitter. The freedom that these machines give you is fantastic. I love going to Africa and watching game, but I can still be in touch…

NOW YOU’RE GETTING IT…

Shared from my Personal Blog, the Missal.

The future of Space Exploration does not lie with the government, but with entrepreneurship and private corporations like SpaceX.

NASA FINALLY CATCHES UP TO THE 21ST CENTURY

IN NO WAY from THE BUSINESS, CAREER, AND WORK OF MAN

I am in no way at war with modern technology. I like modern technology and I am very grateful for all of the good that modern technology does.

 

All I ask is that technology does well by the world in which it operates. This should be true in technological design, and in technological function.

THE SCIENCE, AND THE ART, OF TECHNOLOGICAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

A friend posted this article earlier today on his Facebook page and I have enough personal interest in the subject and the idea occurs often enough in my own inventions, business projects, and writings that I thought I would comment here on the Launch Port.

The iron could have been inserted later, but my general supposition is that Iron, and possibly even Steel development occurred long before what is historically accounted, in certain isolated areas or as a result of individual experiments by certain particularly gifted smiths.

The “Ages” we attribute to history are really just generalizations on wide-spread (what we would call today industrial and/or historical) development. History implies within the very term that there must be an historical record of a thing, and that this record must be available for recognition and study. Without an historical record of some kind there is no history, but whether any particular thing actually exited or not sans an historical record, that is an entirely separate matter.

But smithing used to be art as much as science and some genius (or geniuses) at any particular period of history (or prehistory or non-history) could have easily leapt well ahead of his contemporaries and either the local ruler(s) suppressed wide-spread dissemination of such techniques or the smith himself (for personal and economic reasons) simply kept the secrets to himself and only manufactured small numbers of such artefacts or weapons. Then again local logistical matters and proper supplying may have prevented iron making en masse (as happened with the Hittites and Egyptians), or it could have been a one-off experiment or even an accident that smith was never able to properly reproduce. My father used to be a tool and dye maker and I saw him conduct any number of one-off experiments which he did not properly document or detail and then he later had trouble reproducing.

We moderns, because of our peculiar “industrial techniques” (that is we concentrate as much upon reproducible manufacturing techniques as we do experimental manufacturing methods) think of manufacturing as purely a science, but I suspect most of our ancestors tended to look upon smithing as primarily an art or at the very least an individualized enterprise of high personal skill and craft. We are scientists who like to mimic art in our productions, they were likely artists who were also proto-scientists, but only proto-scientists. Strict record keeping and precise reproduction was probably not a big concern in their worldview. Actually individualization was probably a far bigger concern for them and for their rulers.

Then again you have those recent historical cases of things like the +Ulfberh+t swords where long materiel trade lines combined with unique individualized skill and craft operations to produce weapons and artefacts well ahead of the rest of the world. That is to say there was some localized sub-masse production but for logistical, military, and economic reasons not mass production.

(After all someone has to be the best in the world – just look at US weapon systems compared to most of the rest of the world. Some archaeologist in the far-future, if records are lost or compromised, might assume that there was no US Superpower Age until much later than actually really occurred because the rest of the world is decades if not centuries behind us. The Truth is that is some respects we’re just decades or centuries ahead of everyone else in our weapon systems development, they are not necessarily decades or centuries behind us.)

I suspect the real Truth is that it is a normal thing throughout history and pre-history for some geniuses or particularly cunning individuals to leap well ahead of the curve where the rest of the world is concerned, and when you have ages or eons where it is uncommon to keep records or to store such records properly or even near the artefacts these geniuses create then it is easy to assume that nothing occurs until it becomes obviously apparent to everyone via mass production, or through common usage. But small scale or individualized examples of the thing might have very well existed centuries before such things become common. And because of their small number of productions it is easy to see such examples misplaced, looted, or destroyed and therefore not available for historical discovery or examination.

Truth is someone right now is creating something decades if not centuries ahead of everyone else but it won’t become recognized and it won’t be the “Age of X…” until that thing is widely recognized or able to be mass produced for whatever reasons or reasons.

http://www.humanistictexts.org/sumer.htm#4%20Praise%20of%20Urukagina

 

Introduction

Our oldest written records come from the civilization of Sumer, which arose in around the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers in what is now southern Iraq. The chief cities such as Uruk, Nippur, Ur, and Lagash play a prominent role in the history of the region, being built and destroyed many times over as wars developed between the city states and between them and the surrounding tribes. The Uruk period, 3,750-3150 BCE, saw the emergence of warrior kings, magnificent temples, intensive agriculture by means of irrigation, and the first pictographic writing in 3300 BCE. The early kings gained mythical status,  most notably in the case of Lugualbanda and Gilgamesh, whose myths have survived

Pictographic writing evolved into the cueiform script, made with a reed pressed into soft clay. As clay lasts far longer than vegetable materials, Sumerian cuneiform documents dating as far back as 3100 BCE have been found. A flourishing cuneiform literature in the Sumerian language developed, reaching its peak in the centuries around 2000 BCE. The Sumerian language is not part of the Indo-European group and was replaced in the second millenium by Semitic languages as tribes from the Western deserts and elsewhere moved into the fertile crescent and conquered the area, giving rise to the civilizations of Babylon and Assyria. 

Some insight into Sumerian values can be gained from praise poems written for kings. While the kings may not always live up to this praise they show the type of achievments that they wished to be remembered by. The ones used here to provide characteristic extracts praise Urukagina (Uruinimagina, c 2350) and Gudea (2141-2122), who ruled from Lagash, and Ur-Nammu (2112-2095) and Shulgi (Culgi, 2094-2047), who ruled from Ur. Urukagina appears as a social reformer, getting rid of gross abuses of power that had taken hold in Lagash. He ruled for only eight years, after which the abuses must have returned, because Gudea, a few centuries later, instituted similar reforms. Gudea was also an energetic builder of temples, the most elaborate being at Girsu. The surviving text describing its construction provides insight into the richness of his city state and the dispersed regions from which Sumer acquired resources. As he is not recorded as a constant warrior, many of these materials were probably acquired in trading…

 

THE SILK ROAD TO ELSEWHERE

Where is this going?
Offshore apparently…

bitcoins-660x439

“The nearly 30,000 bitcoins auctioned off by the U.S. Marshals Service last week will be put to use building digital currency businesses outside of the United States.

The bitcoins are part of a massive cache of digital currency seized by the feds in connection with last year’s bust of the Silk Road online drug marketplace. In a first, they were auctioned by the Marshals Service last Friday, but until today, nobody knew who’d purchased them. It turns out that the auction’s winner was venture capitalist Tim Draper, and he’s going to store them with a company he has invested in called Vaurum. The startup sells software and services to international companies that want to set up their own bitcoin exchanges…”

article continued

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